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And yet, despite Biden showing his skills repeatedly since taking office - maeuvering the American Rescue Plan, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill and the Inflation Reduction Act, through congress with only narrow majorities and getting bipartisan support for the infrastructure bill, despite his policies that have promoted the strongest labor mrket in years, despite the fact that inflation is now officially down to under 5%, despite his oyutplaying the Republicans on the debt and budget negotiations , despite him being demonstrably the best president in terms of actual achievement in over 50 years....

Democrats claim not to want him to run again, "progressives" say he isn't any good, and he has approval ratings as bad as Trump's were when Trump was achieving nothing.

Winston Churchill was right, "The best argument against democracy is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

And the over-educated, under-intelligent, otherwise-unemployable trust fund babies of the D.C. Press Corpse can take full credit for their failure to understand anything and misinform people. Biden was right when he told them Saturday that they were idiots for being unable to understand that his not saying good things about the debt bill was good negotiating strategy. I doubt any of the trust fund babies could negotiate their way out of a wet paper bag with chainsaws and hand grenades.

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TC, Indeed! and despite all that you describe above, President Biden's accomplishments need to be shouted from the rooftops. MSM would prefer to spend air time and print on hollowed out "news". CNN evening programs are a waste of time. WAPO and NYT are lazy as well.

How do we get the truth to the voters?

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It would be interesting to see the questions being asked by pollsters and the sample population they are reaching. My concern about Biden's re-election is all about his age, but that won't stop me from voting for him.

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founding

And being younger doesn't seem to have helped any of the other candidates thinking, does it?

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It certainly hasn't.

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founding

Amen!

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Like I keep telling everyone, Biden is the best president of my lifetime, which began under Eisenhower. We are damn lucky to have Biden in the White House. And I say that despite the fact that my biggest single issue, after Democracy and not defaulting on the debt, is immigration, which I think should be greatly reduced, and Biden is doing the opposite.

Every Democratic president beginning with LBJ has ultimately disappointed me (I didn't follow policy at all under JFK). Biden--it's like I'm riding my bicycle across the country (I've been there), and I've finally got the wind at my back--a strong wind. It's amazing!

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Hi, Dave. Thanks for your comment. As you know, I disagree with you on immigration. I plan to write on the subject soon. But for now, it is worth reflecting on the fact that in states that are economic engines of American (California, Texas, NY, NJ), about 1-in-5 residents are immigrants. Without their contributions, those states would be shrinking, struggling, and desperate for more labor.

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Robert, a couple of things to consider. Compared to European countries, we throw away a lot of our young people--people who otherwise could live productive lives. I lived for a decade in a changing, but still mostly Black neighborhood in DC in the '90s. My next door neighbors, and elderly black couple who had migrated up from the Carolinas, an illiterate transmission rebuilder and a checker at one of DC's department stores, had several daughters with children by men whom they weren't married to. They were very nice people. One day, a white couple who I knew, with children ranging from around 5 to 11, came around the block with their children, just as a couple of the grandchildren of my next door couple were in front of the house. I could FEEL the difference in the futures these children would have, and it really felt awful.

There were also plenty of children like that in Hillbilly Elegy--children likely without a decent future. So there are lots of them. (And I have to say I'm very disappointed in Vance for espousing the sort of politics that's doing nothing to give these children a better future. I have tweeted him several times, telling him his grandmother is looking down on him with great disappointment.)

We should follow the lead of Scandinavian countries on education, social safety net, etc.

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Read Nick Kristof's columns in the NYT and his book about deaths of despair among his neighbors and classmates in rural Yamhill, Oregon. Poverty, too many mediocre schools, low expectations, addiction, etc. We're in the 2nd & 3rd generations of children being raised in these circumstances. A loss for those kids and our country.

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A waste of those kids. I've read a little of what he's said about his classmates. Very sad, and stupid that our country doesn't do better, though not surprising having to fight the GOP over the tax cuts for the super wealthy that they want.

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founding

But David, we have perpetuated the myth that we are the best. How could we possibly look to Scandinavia? 😥 Plenty of statistics from maternal deaths to poor math performance, etc in our schools would suggest we should but won’t.

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I remember thinking we were the best, especially when I was a 12 year old living in Paris for a year. I was a car nut, and I thought our cars were much better than French cars. And I suppose I just thought we had a similar relationship to the rest of the world. I now love those same French cars now that I thought didn't measure up to American cars of the mid-'60s, some of which I actually scorned, like 2CVs. Here's a story about that:

https://www.hagerty.com/media/driving/a-60s-summer-in-paris-leads-to-a-search-for-a-good-peugeot-404/

Ignore the title—should have been In Search of Lost Time—With Apologies to Proust

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And Robert, isn't the birth rate declining?

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The US birthrate is still high enough to keep increasing the population, but at a considerably slower rate than before. Immigration, on the other hand, will be adding roughly three and a half New York State population equivalents to the US over the next 40 years.

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You're welcome. And as you know, we agree on almost everything else.

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If we lose immigrants our country comes to a grinding halt. Including your beloved "metro Boston."

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If the population keeps exploding, something with the high rate of immigration is primarily responsible for, we will have far more sprawl, far more global warming emissions (the average immigrant's GH emissions rise threefold after arrival--they come mostly from third world countries), far more traffic, higher housing costs, far less wildlife (we've lost around half the vertebrate wildlife, including birds, that we had in the 1960s), far less in the way of ecosystem services (clean water, fertile soil, pollination, flood prevention, and many others ).

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founding

There are many examples of men & women who are thriving in their 80s, 90s, and at 100. Norman Lear still creating, producing, and directing at 100. Willie Nelson continuing to create, produce, and perform at 90. Judd Hirsch nominated for an Oscar at 87. Mick Jagger at 79. Martha Stewart at 81 thriving In business and on cover of Sports Illustrated. Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlinson, etc. Nancy Pelosi gave us her best as Speaker and continues to serve. I could go on. Here is a list of women currently serving in the House of Representatives. https://www.oldest.org/politics/women-in-congress-currently/

We must stop this insane conversation about Biden’s age and focus on the criminal former president and the malfeasance of the cohort of Republicans who are actively legislating at the state and national level with attacks on transgenders, women, people of color, etc and concurrently undermining the institutions of our country and actively ignoring a climate crises as well as promoting gun rights.

We have much to promote and must move away from the age BS while promoting the good news. Thank you, Jessica Craven, for your weekly Extra! Extra highlighting achievements by a broad array of people and organizations.

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Nancy Pelosi was an amazing Speaker. I loved watching her in action, knowing how old she is! I didn't know about some of the other accomplishments you've mentioned, including Willie Nelson and Norman Lear. But Tom Hornbein, whose name is on the highest couloir on Mt. Everest, was still climbing into his 80s. (If you google Hornbein, a bunch of very recent obits will come up, including from the Washington Post, as he just died at 92.) Another Hornbein, Ruth Kahn Stovroff, passed the driving test with "flying colors" at 96 and also has an impressive obit. Anyway, thank you for this inspiring account.

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It's more important to consider someone's actual condition than his/her chronological age. Biden is obviously quite able mentally and physically, perhaps better than many 40 year olds.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

I am very skeptical about the "media" and reports of progressive disenchantment with President Biden. All of them, from Fox to MSNBC will do anything for "a story" whether it is real or imagined to fit their narrative and keep eyeballs on the screens.

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I am with you there. I often wonder about these so-called"polls" too. Who is responding to them and what are the demographics? I am skeptical of most anything that I hear from our sometimes treacherous mainstream media.

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founding

Victoria, as Robert has told us many times, we are better served by turning away from the pollsters and profit driven headlines. Put our muscle to the grindstone and make 2024 the year America returned to sanity and civility for our well-being and that of the global community.

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Why I cut my cable!

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It's unbelievable how many Democrats still don't want Biden to continue in the office in which, under the circumstances of divided government in which this deal was accomplished, is nothing short of miraculous! Yesterday a friend told me that the Democrats had better nominate someone else! Like who??? Who could have done this against the kind of opposition Biden was dealing with. He is a master negotiator, and I believe only someone with his experience and intelligence could have succeeded. We are blessed!

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founding

Kathleen, it might be better to resist parroting this idea of Biden this or that and keep the conversation on A. The many accomplishments of his time in office and B. The many economic and cultural failures of a right extremist party promoting fear rather than constructive ideas.

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I think it all can be done, but the idea of focusing on the accomplishments is that no one can argue with them, whereas people will argue about Biden's abilities. Good point!

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TCinLA, Agree!!! To watch Karine Jean-Pierre fielding so many inane questions in a White House press conference confirms the truth of your comment.

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founding

TCinLA, you are right on point. A vivid example was The NY Times last weekend with a headline: “Yellon’s Debt Limit Warnings Went Unheeded, Leaving Her To Face Fallout” - https://www.nytimes.com/2023/05/27/us/politics/yellen-debt-limit.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare

Honestly, it is disconcerting to continue to see a news outlet like the Times continuing to offer headlines like this while Heather Cox-Richardson provides clear lessons about what the history of fascists tells us about 1943 and today and Robert regularly provides us with reality checks and resources to act to defend democracy and constitutional law.

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I love my mother’s saying-he couldn’t pour pee out of a boot with directions on the heel!

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Absolutely spot-on TC.

For the life of me, I don't see how so many MAGAs continue to support the freedom corkers that want to cut their Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid; WTF is that?

I cannot wait to wake up one morning and see "Game Over" for the former one.

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Unless you're counting LBJ as in league with Biden, it's over 75 years--over 75 years since Roosevelt died.

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Best comment ever, from anyone!!!

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From the lips of the man who can be credited with Joe Biden being our President: "Let them make headlines...Joe Biden is making headway." ~Rep Jim Clyburn (D-SC)

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Jun 1, 2023·edited Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

President Biden is effective because he doesn't seek to make headlines. It's remarkable how much of the mess he was left he's been able to fix or put back on track.

After this manmade crisis is behind us (and thanks to Biden it will stay that way until after the 2024 election), we must flood the airwaves with our own headlines, and get in front of the inevitable onslaught of Republican attacks against supposed weaknesses.

President Biden is not one to brag or boast. He depends on his record to speak for itself. We need to turn up the volume.

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I worry, Bob, that Biden and many in the party will not say/do enough to shine a light on his tremendous accomplishments, all the while in a horribly divided government. Those of us who read & watch the correct sources must shout it from the rooftops, and not just to each other.

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I agree. We've gotta get outside of our own echo chambers!

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Yes, Lynell!

And you're right about Clyburn's effect in turning around the momentum of the Biden campaign.

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It was evident how masterful President Biden has been over the Republicans and the media and all of us for that matter when it was first revealed that he had suspended the debt ceiling for two years! We are indeed fortunate to have President Biden as our leader at this critical time. Experience and vision is making him a great president! We do need him to finish the job. In regards to age, we need to update our view of who is old. A TED talk I listened to a couple of years ago declared that middle age now went up to 85 years old. We are now living longer and being much more capable through our seventies and eighties. To me, it divided being senior from being geriatric. We need President Biden's experience and vision and the marvelous people in his administration. The split in the Republican Party of traditional conservatives versus MAGA extremist uneducated brats is also becoming quite visible with these debt ceiling negotiations but also with the Texas Republicans splitting over the impeachment of ex-AG Daniel Patrick. We, the People, all of us this time!

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I like the new definition of middle-age!

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Not that relevant, but years ago Bernard Baruch said “Old Age always starts 10 years older than the age you are.”

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Shouldn’t we revise that to 20 years older? ;>)

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Love that you heard that comment about middle age going to 85 at a TED talk. My grandmother, who lived to 102, caused me to say 30 years ago that middle age goes to 85. My father worked until 85 and probably would have worked longer except for my mother's failing health at the time.

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"...it divided being senior from being geriatric..." ✅

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founding

Do you remember the name and or title of the TED talk you reference, Cathy? I did a search and more than one is coming up. In any event, thanks for noting it, and for your entire post!

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Cathy, I ❤️ you❣️

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

I like the tone and wording of your message, that the interests of the majority of Americans were well served, and Biden was skillful and wise on steering the ship on its course.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

"the biggest takeaway is that all Americans can breathe easier because of Joe Biden’s steady hand." Add to the takeaway Joe Biden's keen understanding of the negotiations. Republicans who believe the canard about Joe Biden's cognitive decline fool themselves when they deal with him. The rest of us should remember just how effective Joe Biden has been.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

A clear way to counter cuts to SocSec and MCare is simply to modestly raise the tax rate on withholding taxes, and basically eliminate the taper down of the caps. Second, we need more workers and an even more robust economy!

Why is this so hard?

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Excellent points.

I think this is part of Biden's tax increase proposal for taxpayers making more than $400K. That, and increasing income taxes on corps and wealthy individuals is a no brainer, unless you're a Republican supported by ultra wealthy donors.

Also, we need to wrap our minds around the idea, that providing basic benefits and housing assistance to the poor, could actually lift these folks up to the point that they could hold down a decent job, rather than constantly dealing with the penalties and inconvenience of the ever present need to scrape by just to get food on the table and a place to sleep each day. Why is that so hard?

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

How can a person proclaim themselves a true Christian while waging war against the poor? Perhaps it goes back to the origins in this country of Protestantism and the idea of predestination (?)

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Well, I hope you're not calling out Protestantism for Republican policies. Protestant faiths, including the Episcopal, Lutheran and Methodist churches, are among the most progressive and inclusive denominations. They also have tremendous community outreach programs. The Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service does incredible work in every community helping immigrant families find sponsors and get set up in new homes.

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Paula was referring to a theological belief that is difficult to square with a message that God loves everyone. If God brings some people into the world knowing they are damned, what's the point of charitable works? The fact that the congregations you refer to engage in acts of charity suggests that they believe in grace and redemption, not predetermined damnation.

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Agree. I was referring to the Calvinist belief in the doctrine of predestination, that some are saved and some are lost due to Divine choice. Just speculating whether the unChristian, cruel war on the poor is a reflection of that Calvinist doctrine.

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That could very well be true. I'm somewhat familiar with Calvinism but need to do some more reading on it. I know that over time, some Episcopalians have broken away from the National Church, largely over the issue of gay acceptance, ordination (also over female priests), and marriage. And there are Lutheran congregations that are struggling with the same conflict.

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As a Unitarian Universalist I urge those who seem conflicted about the term “Christianity” to visit UUA.com. We affirm and promote seven Principles,grounded in the humanistic teachings of the world’s religions.

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Interesting insight!

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Thank you, Robert, for perfectly clarifying my awkward comment. I was harkening back to this country’s historical religious roots. Another reason to know and study our history?

I certainly did not mean to malign ANY religion. As a Jew, I am well-aware of the shameful far right Jewish contingent. Jews here and in Israel are struggling with similar issues as America is struggling with. As President Biden stated, “We are in a fight for the soul of our country.” I would add, “...and the soul of our religions.”

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founding

Paula, I was born and raised Catholic. And through the years, until today, I see how the Catholic Church is wanting of compassion and inclusion of the LGBTQ community, of recognizing love, and embracing belonging. As with issues of women's ordination, and heaven knows, of more. So I appreciate your insightful 'add,' of how we are in a struggle for 'the soul of our religions,' near and far and wide.

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People continue to leave their houses of worship. I believe the only religion that is increasing its adherents is evangelicalism. Historically, and until today, organized religion has been and continues to be a force for good and for evil. What we don’t know is what the world would be like if there were no organized religions.

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Totally agree with you. Unfortunately, it appears that there are those who prefer for people not to be lifted up.

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Sadly, I agree.

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I'd like to add to your comments by saying that women I worked with in a homeless shelter for women with children, wanted to work. Their difficulty was in finding affordable childcare. I believe it is shameful for one of the richest countries in the world that we do not provide enough affordable child care to these vulnerable women, and then blame them for not working!

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Wayne, you are 100% correct, on all counts.

I am looking for the right opportunity to write about the need for more immigration.

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I am distressed, however, by the way the situation at our southern border has warped discussions of immigration. The US needs immigrants from the *entire* globe.

Immigration has been politicized by both left and right.

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Sadly the ‘more workers’ may become a serious issue with all the AI potential for taking jobs away from people. I think this is crazy scary. I bet some of the readers here remember the song ‘In the Year 2525’ by Zager and Evans. Sound similar?

It seems things with the ability to make lives better crumble to evil usage in the hands of greed. I really worry AI will somehow be used to alter the 2024 election, and with the ability to change/alter audio and video even easier.

Sorry if this comment is poorly written.

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AI will change the world . . . in some ways, but not others. It appears that we will never have self-driving cars because specialized AI cannot navigate in unexpected conditions--something every teenager can do. In LA, almost every shop has a "help wanted" sign in the window. Many are service jobs, but others are managerial and production jobs. My local big box store has large swaths of empty shelves because they cannot get product. AI is an answer for specific tasks, but not for general tasks. At least that is the current thinking.

There is a very deep issue lurking here which is expressed in a short mathematical / logical query about whether computers can solve all problems quickly, or whether there are classes of problems that are effectively unsolvable because they cannot be solved quickly. Not to get too technical, but the question is whether "P = NP"? If there are classes of problems that cannot be solved quickly, then it is unlikely that general AI (human-like intelligence) will ever be developed. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P_versus_NP_problem

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Why just modestly raise the withholding tax rate? Why not significantly increase or even eliminate the cap, now at $160,200?

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If we don’t have a cap on contributions, we can’t have a cap on withdrawals. Not to say the cap shouldn’t be higher than it is, and maybe include non-salary if needed to reach that cap. But it does need the cap.

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Jan, what do you mean by "a cap on withdrawals"? According to SoSec's website: "The maximum benefit depends on the age you retire. For example, if you retire at full retirement age in 2023, your maximum benefit would be $3,627. However, if you retire at age 62 in 2023, your maximum benefit would be $2,572. If you retire at age 70 in 2023, your maximum benefit would be $4,555." https://faq.ssa.gov/en-US/Topic/article/KA-01897

I don't believe this has anything to do with the withholding tax cap. Correct me if I'm wrong or if I'm missing something.

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Jun 1, 2023·edited Jun 1, 2023

Mim, you suggested eliminating the cap on taxable income (currently $160,200). I believe that if you eliminate that cap, then there are those who will say that if the highest incomes (let’s say $1M+, for example) are still being taxed, the the max benefit should also be higher, not capped at $4,555 (per your example).

I’m not saying those payments Should be higher, only that it will be so argued by those who have put significantly more in. I absolutely think we should raise it, however.

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Yes, we do need more immigration.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

THANK GOD FOR JOE BIDEN.

A genius at navigating American partisan politics..at this point, we can't underestimate the value of 36 years in the US Senate..

On to a 2024 landslide✌️✌️

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Yes!! And thankful for Steve Ricchetti

Counselor to the President of the United States, who was there every step of the way.

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Yes; I should have included Ricchetti. I am less familiar with his background/work, perhaps because his job is less visible than director of OMB.

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Robert, I listened to Shalanda Young a few days ago during the WH press conference- she is amazing. The way she handled those questions! 👍

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Thank you for your skilled focus on what matters most for us to know, appreciate, consider, and keep in mind as we move forward, with Biden having skillfully shown us the way, and we have our work cut out for us. Democracy requires it!

Lifting you, Jill and family in prayer each morning as we know of your daily trek through the thick of Los Angeles traffic. Hoping the results are beneficial, and that perhaps some traffic workarounds have appeared to alleviate the fearsome commute. Travel safely.🙏🏽

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

I really really like it when I see good people succeed.

And I really really like it when good people point that out.

Thank you, Robert Hubbell.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Thank you Robert. Safe navigation of the Sepulveda Pass and the 405. I woke up this morning (It is 9 am here in Spain) thinking of your drive. I especially like today's enumeration of all Biden has done. This is the message we all need to voice every day.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

So what just happened? Over 70% of the House of Representatives just voted to approve the deal cut by the President and Mr. McCarthy. Was there ever any serious doubt that once a deal was reached, that would be the result? The most serious problem seems to have been moving the issue to the floor of the House.

Two observations: first, the obscure rules of both chambers represent impediments to effective governance. I for one knew about the Rules Committee but had no previous knowledge regarding its composition (13 Republicans, 4 Democrats), its "traditions" (opposition from the minority party), or -- I suppose -- its absolute chokehold on forward movement. The Senate has its own arcana including, of course, the filibuster. Why is any of this stuff consistent with the Constitution?

Second, the media has too much space to occupy and not nearly enough content. So it resorts to catastrophizing and repetition to fill a large and growing gap. That makes it hard for anyone trying to figure out what is going on in the country and what is really important. The stance adopted by the media actually tends to mislead the public for the sake of an economic return.

The result in the House was, in my estimation, preordained, once there was a deal and it emerged from the Rules Committee. And it might be said that the result in the Rules Committe was never seriously in doubt.

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Exactly: the media has too much space to occupy and not nearly enough content. So it resorts to catastrophizing and repetition to fill a large and growing gap

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Yes! Everything is breaking news with breathless delivery. Not my idea of journalism!!

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"the media has too much space to occupy and not nearly enough content." AMEN to that!

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Joe Biden has been and is a very good President. We need to shout this message. Simon Rosenberg asks this of this of us daily to counteract the ridiculous narrative that we all hear. This clip shows how strong the US economy is under Joe Biden. https://youtu.be/Ccvoouypo5Q

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

I would kick your acclamation up a notch to GREAT! I haven't seen this level of amazing, presidential greatness and grace in my lifetime..and just a little younger Joe..

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Once again, I turn to social media, in the right places, and find wonderful gems of encouragement and truth.

Thanks for that link to Fareed Zakaria. I'll be posting it to other locations, like Joe Blogs YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/@JoeBlogs

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Jun 1, 2023·edited Jun 1, 2023

Yes, Fareed Zakaria's take was refreshing TV.

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Agreed. The NY Times Pitchbot parody Twitter account is hardly even parody. MSM is maddening these days.

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Wonderful video! Thanks for posting it.

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Thank you for the YouTube link. Very interesting. To paraphrase Mark Twain, the rumors of the US’s demise are greatly exaggerated.

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You don’t see this news in the MSM. It’s always doom and gloom.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Thank you, Robert. I very much appreciate your cogent analyses of the debt ceiling machinations.

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Another wonderful analysis from Robert Hubbell. I was dismayed to see my congresswoman from Washington state voted against the bill (the progressive Jayapal). I guess the only upside is that had the progressive caucus voted in favor, more Republicans may have jumped ship!

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Hi, Diane. As Lawrence O'Donnell noted last night, it is a healthy thing for some Democrats to vote against the bill. It gives Joe Biden credibility when he tells McCarthy, "If you demand X, I can't get enough votes to support it." So Rep. Jayapal plays an important role in maintaining Biden's negotiating credibility. In the end, if her vote was the difference between approving the bill or default, she would have voted to approve the bill. I don't think you should be disappointed in Rep. Jayapal.

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What an intricate dance this is... More kudos to Biden and his team... and to every one of them apparently playing a role. (thanks to everyone who replied, above and below.)

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I find it a challenge to deal with people who disagree with me on important issues. Nevertheless, I look at leaders like Joe Biden and see that they do that very thing.

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Great point, Bob! I struggle with the same thing, and President Biden shows us the way!

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

I got a fund raising request from her last night. I don't think so. There were more than enough Dems voting

YES to cover the red no.

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author

Hi, Victoria. I am re-posting a response from above regarding Rep. Jayapal:

As Lawrence O'Donnell noted last night, it is a healthy thing for some Democrats to vote against the bill. It gives Joe Biden credibility when he tells McCarthy, "If you demand X, I can't get enough votes to support it." So Rep. Jayapal plays an important role in maintaining Biden's negotiating credibility. In the end, if her vote was the difference between approving the bill or default, she would have voted to approve the bill. I don't think you should be disappointed in Rep. Jayapal.

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The dems who voted against, did it on purpose knowing it would pass. They did the right thing.

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Jun 1, 2023·edited Jun 1, 2023Liked by Robert B. Hubbell

Bernie Sanders and Tim Kaine are both crying foul over the pipeline project in the deal that ignored any input from Kaine's constituents, and they are correct. The pipeline is a slap in the face, and gives fossil fuel companies, who are killing the planet, a free ride to ignore the rules.

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And the frightening thing is what little noise is being made about this further degradation wrought by fossil fuels. This must not stand. The youth vote is not to be dismissed. TAX THE RICH!! Vote!

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Biden would not have permitted the unfortunate inclusion of the fossil fuel line without good political reasons. If it contributes to preserving a precious Democratic Senate seat in 2024, even if the Senator is the woeful Joe Manchin, it's worth it. The pipeline will become increasingly irrelevant as renewables come on line. And if Bernie were president, there would have been no budget deal; we'd be in default.

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Bernie would have used the 14th amendment and stopped the unnecessary chaos. Here's his statement: https://www.sanders.senate.gov/press-releases/news-sanders-to-vote-no-on-debt-ceiling-deal/

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I always know when people talk about Bernie that they haven't explored everything he hasn't gotten done in VT. And how many times he doesn't show up for votes.

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I heard last night that President Biden had promised to include that amendment "in a future bill" in return for Manchin's Yes vote on one of the earlier substantive bills passed by Congress last year. This seems an unfortunate choice as the bill to include it in as it's possible that, if Kaine's amendment to delete it is approved, the bill, once approved by the Senate, will (may?) have to return to the House for ratification. Given the House vote to approve the bill, it's hopeful that even if the bill is returned to the House. We'll see.

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Thank you for the link. No wonder Senator Kaine is hopping mad; hopefully, he'll have some luck with his amendment.

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Why oh why couldn't Biden use the 14th? Negotiating sets a horrible precedent. Is it too late to use the 14th?

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I am eating crow this morning. One thing Dumbo Trump was good at was tagging enemies with slimy nicknames. So reaching beyond the slime he would have to call the president Foxy Joe. Well done Mr. President. Though I like to think of myself as a radical the no votes by some progressive Democrats annoys me tremendously. Another reason Adam Schiff should have the support he needs to be Senator; I hope my friends backing Katie Porter reconsider in light of her vote against sanity. and duty. Yes Jeffries had the votes which green lighted the nays but still they were pandering to ideology and neglecting their constitutional responsibility to pay our debts. It’s called sacrificing the good to the perfect. Great news day all around.

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As Robert posted above in response to a similar comment of disappointment, "As Lawrence O'Donnell noted last night, it is a healthy thing for some Democrats to vote against the bill. It gives Joe Biden credibility when he tells McCarthy, "If you demand X, I can't get enough votes to support it." So Rep. Jayapal plays an important role in maintaining Biden's negotiating credibility. In the end, if her vote was the difference between approving the bill or default, she would have voted to approve the bill. I don't think you should be disappointed in Rep. Jayapal."

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